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SHADY DEL KNIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR

SHADY DEL KNIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR
High School Yearbook Photo

"More than a place, the Shady Dell was and will forever remain a state of mind." - Shady Del Knight

"More than a place, the Shady Dell was and will forever remain a state of mind." - Shady Del Knight
HELLO STRANGER ... IT SEEMS LIKE A MIGHTY LONG TIME!

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Perfect Storms: The 10 Most Exciting Records...Ever! (Part 9)

To complete my survey of The Most Exciting Records...Ever, I now begin my countdown of the most exciting offerings by UK artists.

19. “Where Have All the Good Times Gone” – Kinks
(April 1966)

Where have all the good times gone? It's a question every Dell rat asks. It's also a rockin' killer bee by the Kinks, the flip side of "Till the End of the Day." Both sides of that Kinks super single grew on me in recent years to such an extent that they overtook "You Really Got Me," "It's All Right" and "Sunny Afternoon" as my Kinks favorites. The Kinks lost me later on when they refined their sound and recorded more intellectual material. Sorry guys, I don't want to think. I wanna rock and "Where Have All the Good Times Gone" is just the ticket. Listen now to the Kinks at their raw, unpolished best.



18. “Till the End of the Day” – Kinks (April 1966)

"Till the End of the Day" was a Brit beat smash just waiting to happen, but somehow it only a became minor hit in the USA reaching its zenith halfway up the Billboard chart. Perhaps there is an explanation. By 1966 Motown was coming on strong with a host of star attractions and chart topping hits. At the same time the British Invasion was on the wane. Records released by UK artists were no longer automatic hits like they were in 1964 when the entire western world was enchanted by the Beatles and all things British.

With its aggressive, hard-charging, stuttering beat, "Till the End of the Day" is one of the best British rock ‘n roll recordings of the period. There’s no gradual build-up in the intensity level. The Davies brothers and their merry mates rock hard from beginning to end. "Till The End Of The Day"
is bold, brash and uncompromising. That's code for exciting!



17. “19th Nervous Breakdown” – Rolling Stones (March 1966)

My Most Exciting Records list wouldn't have much credibility without a few by the Rolling Stones. In 1964, the Beatles’ chief rivals on the UK music scene were the Dave Clark Five. Fans drew comparisons and argued which band was best.
By early 1965 the rough and tumble Rolling Stones were beginning to surpass the more subdued and civilized DC5 in popularity, moving firmly into second place in the British Invasion sweepstakes. The Beatles broke up a few years later, but the Rolling Stones continued to tour the world, knocking out hit albums and singles for decades to come. The Rolling Stones shook up polite society with their look, their sound, their attitude, and their brutal honesty as they shared with us 3 minute stories about pill popping mommas, poor little rich girls, and 19th nervous breakdowns.



16. “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” – Rolling Stones (June 1968)

No matter what kind of bag the Rolling Stones explored - blues, R&B, rock, psychedelic - most of their fans, myself included, happily went along for the ride. In the summer of 1968 the Brit bad boys scored a monster Shady Dell hit with "Jumpin' Jack Flash." The bold rocker was seen as the band's return to its blues roots after their foray into psychedelia. "Jumpin Jack Flash" keeps the excitement metter pegged. No wonder it became the song most frequently played by the Stones on their concert tours!



15. “Paint it, Black” – Rolling Stones (May 1966)

"Paint it, Black" was a single taken from the highly regarded Aftermath, the first Rolling Stones album containing all original material. It also marked the first time the band broke free of their blues and R&B roots and began to exhibit eastern, Dylanesque and psychedelic influences in their work. "Paint It, Black" features the exotic sound of a sitar in what critics call the most effective use of an Indian instrument ever in a rock song. "Paint It, Black" was another important Dell song, and became a #1 hit on both sides of the Atlantic.



Which British recordings are even more exciting than these? Find out when the countdown continues in my next post!

Have a Shady day!

2 comments:

  1. The Kinks and The Stones, two of my favourite bands.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for reading and thanks for posting, Emily! This is a 4-part countdown of my faves from the UK. If you'll kindly stick around, Miss Em, I'd like you to Meet the Beatles.

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