CLOSE YOUR EYES. TAKE A DEEP BREATH. OPEN YOUR HEART.

SHADY DEL KNIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR

SHADY DEL KNIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR
High School Yearbook Photo

"More than a place, the Shady Dell was and will forever remain a state of mind." - Shady Del Knight

"More than a place, the Shady Dell was and will forever remain a state of mind." - Shady Del Knight
HELLO STRANGER ... IT SEEMS LIKE A MIGHTY LONG TIME!

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Is It Just Me... or Is This Just Wrong? Volume 1: Little Miss Ogynistic


Today I ask the question

"Is it just me...

or is this just wrong?"

This new series is not about music appreciation.
It's not a battle of the bands.  My goal is to spark
discussion about the lyrics of certain songs and
the images presented in popular music videos.

A post published by my dear friend Cherdo at
Cherdo On The Flipside inspired me to begin this
controversial new series. Another dear friend,
Janie Junebug at WOMEN: WE'RE GONNA
 KICK BUTT AND TAKE NAMES! reminded
me about an early 60s record that
serves as an ideal starting point.


 YOU BEAT ME TO THE PUNCH 


Shortly after its release in 1962, "He Hit Me
(And it Felt Like a Kiss)," a Carole King - Gerry Goffin
song recorded by Phil Spector's girl group, the Crystals,
drew protests on the grounds that it promoted domestic
violence against women. The record was quickly
banned by radio stations and failed to chart.

 "He Hit Me (And It Felt Like a Kiss)" 
 The Crystals (July 1962, uncharted) 




I suppose it seemed like a good idea at the time, but we've come a long way, baby, since the days when songs for teenagers that were essentially tutorials on the acceptable rules of dating, gave
a free pass to bad boys (aka "rebels")
to smack their girlfriends around, osten-
sibly as a way of proving their true love.

HEY, LEADER OF THE PACK...

GET A CLUE!

Seems to me that "He Hit Me" leaves little room
for debate. The record was rejected by the public
in 1962. It was wrong then and it's wrong today.


 "BORN A WOMAN" 


A woman's place in this old world
Is under some man's thumb

Feminists in particular might have a hard time
believing that a song based on that Stone Age
notion earned country pop singer Sandy Posey
two Grammy nominations. Sandy's 1966 single,
"Born a Woman," sold over a million copies.

 "Born a Woman" - Sandy Posey 
 (Sept. 1966, highest chart pos. #12) 




I wonder how many women of all ages embraced their low self esteem as normal after listening to Sandy's message. How many others were outraged by it, spurred into action and reinvented themselves as strong, independent women?
(Think Janie Junebug.)


Now that you have listened to both songs,
pick the answer below that most closely
matches your opinion, or tell me in your
own words how you feel about what
you heard.  Which song do you find
more offensive? Or don't you think
 either one is offensive?

 YOU BE THE JUDGE, CITIZEN! 


 YOU MAKE THE CALL! 


 * Shady, I agree with you. These two songs 
 are just plain wrong.  They send the wrong 
 message to boys, girls, men and women 
 that controlling, dominating and hitting 
 are normal and acceptable in a relationship. 


 * Shady, get real, dude!  A little misogyny 
 is good for business and sells records. For 
 decades, popular songs have endorsed the idea 
 that women are male possessions and should 
 be treated accordingly. By today's standards,  
 these songs are not only tame...they're lame! 


Let me hear from you.

Let's discuss it.

Have a Shady day!